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Tips to Make Great Videos and Essays!

Contest PosterMany of you are working hard on your submissions for our video and essay contests. We’ve put together a number of tips to help you make the best videos and write the best essays that you can. Check them out below!

Also, don’t forget to download your video submission checklist and essay submission checklist.

You can also participate in our Social Media contest for your chance to win an iPad Mini.Use the hashtag #SISOuch to tell us your experiences at work, share a favourite safety slogan, or tell us how YOU stay safe at work! Your tips could help save a life!


For more information about the contests, including submission criteria, eligibility and more please visit www.safetyinschools.ca/contests.

Tips to make a great video!

  1. Know your message: What is the main point you are trying to get across? Everything else should lead back to that main theme. When someone finishes watching the video, there should be no question what message you were trying to achieve.
  2. Give yourself lots of time: Don’t start shooting a few days before you plan to submit your video. You need to give yourself time to shoot and re-shoot if necessary, to make changes to the script if it doesn’t turn out how you envisioned it, and to edit.
  3. Pick a good location: You should film in a place that has good lighting and is generally quiet. If you’re shooting outside, don’t do it on a windy day and angle your recording device so it doesn’t pick up on the breeze.
  4. Watch your angles: You want to make sure that the viewers focus is drawn to where you want it and that the frame is visually stimulating.
  5. Speak clearly: You need to know what you are going to say so that you can say it loud and clearly. Create a script with bullet points and practice the recording to get the hang of it. Expect to take several shots before you get it completely right.
  6. Don’t be a robot: Act like you’re talking to someone, not a camera. It might help you act more naturally if you are walking while you talk, or using props or visual aids. Use your face and body language to convey emotion and to reinforce your words. Don’t be afraid to make jokes or be a little corny. Inject some of your unique personality into it.
  7. Make sure your recording device is stable: There is nothing worse in a video than a shaky camera. If you have access to a tripod, use it! Otherwise, find a way to make sure your camera is stable and not shaking.

Obviously, the most important thing is that you clearly identify the situation that your video is centred on and the lessons that you learned from that situation. To that end, these are the main points that you want to achieve:

  1. Tell us about the incident you witnessed or experienced: Who was involved? When did it happen? Was there something different about that day? Were you or the people involved tired, rushed or distracted? Was everyone involved properly trained?
  2. Tell us what could have been done to avoid the incident: Could there have been a more effective procedure in place? Could the proper procedure have been better communicated? Could the relevant training have been more comprehensive or interesting? Could the hazard have been identified and eliminated, reduced or mitigated? Could those involved have been using personal protective equipment? Could you have communicated more effectively as a team? In all workplace incidents, any number of items can be identified that could have changed the outcome if they had been paid attention to.
  3. Tell us about the impact of  the incident: Who was impacted by it and in what ways? What were the emotional, physical and financial impacts on the person(s) directly affected as well as those who witnessed the event and the company?
  4. Tell us what lessons you learned from this experience: Have you changed any of your own behaviours and attitudes at work? Do you now use equipment or procedures that perhaps you didn’t think were important before? Do you speak up more about safety? Did the incident reinforce lessons that you learned in school or in your safety training?

Tips to write a great essay!

  1. Know your message: What is the main point you are trying to get across? Everything else should lead back to that main theme. When reading the essay, there should be no question as to what message you were trying to achieve.
  2. Start with an outline: Know what you are going to say before you begin writing. Having a bullet-point outline will help you to keep your thoughts organized and will allow you to make sure you hit all of the important points.
  3. Give yourself lots of time: Don’t start writing a few days before you plan to submit your essay. You need to give yourself time to proofread and edit the essay.
  4. Write clearly: Write the way a person would normally talk. Don’t use large or complicated words and terms when a simple one will do, especially if you’re not 100% sure how to use them!

Obviously, the most important thing is that you clearly identify the situation that your essay is centred on and the lessons that you learned from that situation. To that end, these are the main points that you want to achieve:

  1. Tell us about the incident you witnessed or experienced: Who was involved? When did it happen? Was there something different about that day? Were you or the people involved tired, rushed or distracted? Was everyone involved properly trained?
  2. Tell us what could have been done to avoid the incident: Could there have been a more effective procedure in place? Could the proper procedure have been better communicated? Could the relevant training have been more comprehensive or interesting? Could the hazard have been identified and eliminated, reduced or mitigated? Could those involved have been using personal protective equipment? Could you have communicated more effectively as a team? In all workplace incidents, any number of items can be identified that could have changed the outcome if they had been paid attention to.
  3. Tell us about the impact of  the incident: Who was impacted by it and in what ways? What were the emotional, physical and financial impacts on the person(s) directly affected as well as those who witnessed the event and the company?
  4. Tell us what lessons you learned from this experience: Have you changed any of your own behaviours and attitudes at work? Do you now use equipment or procedures that perhaps you didn’t think were important before? Do you speak up more about safety? Did the incident reinforce lessons that you learned in school or in your safety training?